Posts Tagged ‘food truck’

Here it is, Thanksgiving, and we’ve been reflecting on some of the things for which we have to be thankful. Our list includes some of the usual – family, country, and employment during challenging times, but we have come up with an additional list of 10 things we are thankful for within the food truck industry, and wanted to share it with you.

  • The way communities are re-writing their laws to allow more trucks to open.
  • The various and creative cuisine food trucks are providing their customers.
  • The ability for people to follow trucks through social media.
  • The way the food truck industry has helped numerous communities economically.
  • The spread of positive coverage of the industry within the mainstream media.
  • The time, effort and donations that people in the industry have given to help organizations that help feed the needy.
  • The friends we have made from publishing this magazine.
  • The knowledge we have gained from researching the food truck industry.
  • The wonderful food we have been able to eat while visiting various food trucks.

Last but not least, and certainly our favorite item that we are thankful for;

  • The food truck community itself and the wonderful people in it.

You are our readers, the people we write for and about. No other business community has such a loyal group of members and we hope for continued success in our coverage, and the industry as a whole. So when we cut into our holiday birds and reflect on all the things for which we’re thankful, one of the biggest will be the fact that we have this industry.

From Mobile Cuisine Magazine, Happy Thanksgiving everyone!

If you are thankful for something about the food truck industry, please share it in the comments below.

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Food Truck Driving Safety Tips

Posted: November 23, 2010 in Driving Safety
Tags: ,

Photo by 27ray via the LAist Featured Photos pool on Flickr

In today’s earlier article we covered a story of a food truck owner being hit and killed by another driver. This and the fact that the winter months are coming to us quickly got us thinking to provide a list of tips that truck owners and drivers should maintain constant knowledge of to prevent themselves from being the next or causing the next fatality on the road.

 

TAKE CARE OF YOURSELF!
The most important part of a moving truck is the driver! Get plenty of rest before getting behind the wheel. Eat well and stay fit. Remember, driving without proper rest can threaten your livelihood or even your life. Stay healthy and well rested, or don’t drive!

ALWAYS MAINTAIN YOUR VEHICLE
Inspect your vehicle before each trip and check your brakes regularly. Learn how to inspect your brakes, identify safety defects, and get them repaired before risking your life and others on the road.

BE AWARE OF YOUR “NO-ZONE”
Other drivers may not be aware of the size of your truck’s blind spots. Be vigilant in watching out for vehicles in the No-Zone. The No-Zone represents the danger areas, or blind spots, around trucks where crashes are more likely to occur. One-third of all crashes between trucks and cars take place in the No-Zone.

SLOW DOWN IN WORK ZONES
Watch out for road construction. Stay alert. Work zone crashes are more likely to happen during the day. Almost one-third of fatal crashes in work zones involved trucks. Take your time going through work zones and give yourself plenty of room. Expect the unexpected!

ALWAYS KEEP YOUR DISTANCE
Always leave enough space between you and the vehicle in front of you. If you hit someone from behind, you are typically considered “at fault,” regardless of the situation. Trucks require more stopping distances than other vehicles. Take advantage of your driving height, and anticipate braking situations.

FASTEN YOUR SEAT BELT
Buckle up for safety and control. If you are in a crash, a seat belt can save your life and those around you. It will keep you in your seat and allow you to maintain control of your truck. A major cause of truck fatalities involves being ejected from the vehicle. Wearing seat belts is still the single most effective thing all drivers can do to save lives and reduce injures on our roadways.

ALWAYS DRIVE DEFENSIVELY
Avoid aggressive drivers! It’s estimated that each year two-thirds of all traffic fatalities are caused by aggressive driving behaviors. Keep your distance and maintain a safe speed. The only thing speed will increase is your chance for a crash.

WORK TO HELP YOURSELVES
Be the professional on the highway and at safety events! Help stranded motorists; notify traffic safety agencies of crashes, unsafe drivers, unsafe roadway conditions, and other situations that can lead to crashes. Your participation in public safety events and your performance on the highway can change public perception!

We understand that these tips would not have prevented Jose Goncalves’ death; however we felt that providing these tips can still help those who spend time behind the wheel of a food truck. Please be safe on the roads.

Jose Goncalves, owner of “Joe’s Cafe”, was standing outside of his food  truck near Park and 7th St., in Newark, NJ, when a speeding car slammed into them last Thursday morning.

He was taken to University Hospital where doctors pronounced him dead shortly before 9 a.m., said Katherine Carter, spokeswoman for the Essex County Prosecutor’s Office.

At the time of the accident Goncalves was speaking with his wife, Vania, who was also hit by the car, but not injured. No charges have yet been filed for the driver, from East Orange, who was being treated for shock at the scene.

A police investigation is ongoing.

Mobile Cuisine Magazine sends out our thoughts and best wishes to Mr. Gonclaves’ friends and family.

 

Mobile Cuisine Magazine is proud to provide our readers with another article designed to inform them about a multifaceted program that is spreading throughout the country. We have designated our Monday features to help promote the Meatless Monday’s program which not only do we support on the website, but our staff actually has adopted in our Monday dietary lifestyle.

In today’s article we will focus on some of the fallacies that most vegetarians or vegans have to deal with every day of their lives. When someone decides to make this dietary leap they are normally questioned by friends and family as to how healthy giving up meat actually is.  The critics (usually only informed by propaganda the meat industry has hand fed them over the years), usually come up with the same questions and they are typically centered on protein intake.

We want to dispel a number of myths related to protein, since this argument seems to be always brought up when trying to dissuade people from eliminating meat from their diet, even if the program only promotes giving up meat on a single day of the week.

During the 6 months I spent as a full time vegetarian the word on the street about vegetarians was that we didn’t get enough protein. If I didn’t eat meat how in the world was I getting the amount I needed? According to those who questioned me, meat is the ONLY viable source of protein. This may be the most commonly held misconception about a vegetarian diet. People fail to realize that meat is not the only source of protein in nature and today, we are going to prove it.

What exactly is protein?

  • Protein is an important building block for your hair, skin, nails, muscles, hormones, blood, and immunity. You cannot survive without proteins
  • Proteins are polypeptides (i.e. amino acid chains) which are essential for cellular health. Your body already produces most amino acids, but there are 9 amino acids that are essential and must be sought out.
  • Protein, along with fats and carbohydrates, are considered macronutrients, meaning your body needs large quantities of them to function.
  • Every gram of protein has 4 calories
  • Proteins are classified as either “complete” or “incomplete” based on whether all 9 essential amino acids are present.

Two Common Protein Myths

  • You can only get protein from animal sources. The only way this statement we’re true is if we modified the word protein with the word “complete”. And that’s where we believe this myth comes from, people associating complete protein as the only true protein.
  • You need to eat a lot of protein daily. People have been misled to think that they need to load up on protein to be healthy, the more protein the better. Well, this is false. Americans actually consume MORE than the necessary amount of daily protein. While there is no agreed amount for required daily protein intake, some scientific bodies have put it around 10%-20% of daily calorie intake (given that you take the recommended calorie intake). And some have suggested that you eat half a gram of protein for every kilogram of body weight.

Sources of protein

Legumes – also called dried beans are edible seeds that grow in pods. Examples are chickpeas, split peas, haricot, lentils (red, green or brown), kidney beans etc.

Photo from shahtraining.com

Nuts & seeds – Nuts are fruits that have a hard outer shell that encloses a kernel, which is also called a nut. Seeds are contained in fruits of plants and are capable of reproducing a new plant. Many nuts and seeds are available both in and out of the shell, whole, halved, sliced, chopped, raw, or roasted example are cashew, peanuts, walnuts, almonds.

Dairy products – Dairy foods are products made from milk, the liquid secreted by female mammals for suckling their young. Choose nonfat or low-fat milk, yogurt and cheese for daily consumption. Save high-fat cheeses and ice cream for occasional treats.

Cereals & food grains – Grains are the seeds or fruit of cereal plants, used as food by humans and animals. Choose whole grain flours, cereals, wheat & rye breads, buckwheat pancakes, muffins & scones, noodles and pasta. Check the nutritional facts panel on the label for fat, sugar, and additives. Eat grain with complementary protein. Experiment with high quality grains, such as amaranth and quinoa.

Soyabean – A versatile bean use extensively in cooking, the soybean also serves as the basis for a wide variety of soya foods consumed. Soybeans are the richest plant source of high-quality protein. The most common soya form is still tofu, but today, the soybean takes on many other forms, including burgers, dogs, bacon, sausage, and many other meat substitutes.

Seitan – has been used in Asia as a protein source and meat substitute for hundreds of years. Seitan can be prepared from scratch using whole-wheat flour. The flour is mixed with enough water to make into a dough that is then kneaded in water and rinsed to remove the starch and the bran. The protein, or gluten, remains and is then simmered in a broth flavored with soya sauce to become seitan. The longer the gluten simmers, the firmer it becomes. Seitan can then be sliced for sautés or stir-fries, diced into stews, soups, or casseroles, or formed into roasts. People who are allergic to wheat or wheat gluten should avoid seitan. Do not use if you are gluten-sensitive. A good source of protein delivering 23g/30 gms of Seitan.

Vegetables – are loaded with vitamins and minerals essential for varied body processes and have been shown to provide protection against a variety of illnesses. Textured vegetable protein is also a good substitute for ground beef in dishes such as tacos, chilli, and stews.

Eggs – Brown or white? Either and both is a source of complete protein. The color of the egg’s shell is simply an indicator of the breed of hen that laid the egg. Eggs yolks are among the few foods that contain vitamin D. Eggs are the centerpiece of a range of foods. Many egg dishes, such as omelets and frittatas, can be prepared quickly with many interesting fillings, such as peppers, tomatoes, or zucchini.

We hope that those of you that have avoided joining this movement because of the protein fallacies you’ve been taught over the years, can take the information from this article, to help yourself take a healthy step the next time you are planning to find a food truck on Monday, In an earlier article, we suggested some and provided a list of vegetarian and vegan food trucks if you would like to follow them. We hope this list helps you in finding a truck in your area.

Please do your part today and join the Meatless Monday movement? Signing up is fast and easy! Follow them on Twittter.

Mobile Cuisine Magazine looks forward to continued coverage of Meatless Monday for our readers!

 

Staying in the state of Ohio as we did earlier this week with a profile of a Columbus food truck, in today’s spotlight, we move southward to Cincinnati where the City Council just approved the cities fourth location for food trucks to congregate to provide their mobile offerings. Back in June, the City Council approved a pilot program giving food trucks three designated places to park.  Twenty vendors have permits from the city to use the locations.

Councilwoman Laure Quinlivan, who introduced the legislation, spoke with constituents, vendors and business owners in the areas around the locations and found all but a few pleased with the program so far. Trucks have been able to park on Court Street, at Fifth and Race streets, adjacent to Sawyer Point parking, with the new location added; they may also park south of the Purple People abutment. This new location is scheduled to have its first vendors show up on Monday.

In a means to appease some business owners near the Court Street location, the Council also voted to limit the hours of this truck spot to 6 am to 3 pm.

It should be apparent that this type of arrangement is more attuned to cities that do not have the same type of foot traffic that many urban centers in the United States have. Rather than just shrugging their shoulders and turning their back to bringing the people of their city more food options, we applaud Cincinnati for their continued support of their community and the food truck industry there.

Here are some of the top food trucks in Cincinnati, the fare they serve and their pricing:

Cafe de Wheels: Burgers, fries, Cuban sandwiches and made to order veggie burgers. It usually sets up at lunchtime on weekdays near the courthouse. It is cash only, and most items are less than $9.

Follow: Website / Twitter

Habanero Burrito Wagon: Burritos (chicken, steak, pork, fish, veggie), $5; tacos (same offerings), $2-3; Mexican sodas/Mexican Coca-Cola; chips and salsa, cookies, desserts. Nothing on the truck costs more than $5.

Follow: Website / Twitter

Señor Roy’s Taco Patrol: Tacos (flank steak, grilled chicken or Al Pastor slow-roasted pork shoulder) are two for $5 or three for $6. Burritos or quesadillas are $6 each, and everything else on the menu is $5 or less.

Follow: Website / Twitter

Taco Azul: Tacos are $2 or three for $5; burritos are $7; and most menu items are $5 or less.

Follow: Website / Twitter

The Chilimobile: Cheese coneys for $2. This truck can be found in the city parking lot at 5th and Race across from Macy’s.

Follow: Website / Twitter

 

This summer marked a new round of competition for Los Angeles based food trucks Kogi BBQ and Bull Kogi. Their 2 dollar Korean taco menu is being assaulted by a truck offering the same cuisine for half the price. Pyongyang Express is a North Korean food truck that proudly flies the flag of the Democratic People’s Republic of Korea and an image of its dictator Kim Jong Il but the difference from this truck and its rivals in the Los Angeles area is that this truck was designed to provide viral marketing for a video game.

THQ’s Homefront is to be a first person shooter style game that revolves around a plot which has North Korea invading the United States in the year 2027, and is due for release in March of 2011. Although the Pyongyang Express was launched in June, the fact that the game’s release is less than 6 months away means the truck already has a use no later than stamp on it. If the rumors are true, these Los Angeles truck owners won’t have to deal with this invasion for the entire 6 months. We have heard through the grapevine that the Pyongyang Express may be headed to New York and San Francisco to market in those cities before the game’s release, leaving LA in its dust in the near future.

Behind the wheel and stove of the truck is 76 year old Bob Gottlieb, who just so happens to be a Korean War veteran, a US Korean War veteran at that. When asked about his thoughts about the fare he prepares he said, “North Korean people take much honor and care in every ingredient used in their recipes, unlike very fast, tasteless food. Pyongyang BBQ caters gourmet food and should not be considered street food.” Gottlieb also mentioned that at one of its early stops, the truck was shooed away from the front of the Korean Consulate by armed guards. Not quite what one might expect from fellow comrades.

Angeleanos have not been too concerned with this marketing ploy, as they have been more interested in the trucks motto; Subsidized Good Food for a Better America. The truck offers a simple, yet inexpensive menu which includes chicken or beef Korean tacos, chicken or beef rice bowls and kimchee quesadillas. All of these items are priced at 2 dollars and under.

Another topic that may ease the minds of the popular Korean taco trucks comes from Tyrone Miller, part of the Public Relations team at THQ, “Our goal is not to get into the food truck-management business; frankly, we’re not making any money on this.” Using a food truck as a marketing tool is nothing new as we mentioned in our article earlier this week, but even THQ wasn’t sure Americans would take kindly to their campaign. “We had a whole crisis management plan ready to go;” Miller said, “but thankfully we haven’t needed it.”

Will this Korean food truck be looked at as part of the Axle of Evil (excuse the pun), or will their customers take into account that the meals they order consist of more food than the average North Korean eats in a month, for under 5 dollars?

Have you had a chance to try out their food, if so, what are your thoughts?

Thanks to our friends over at the Cleveland Plain Dealer, we bring you a story of one Cleveland food truck owner and his adventure into the food truck industry.

Chef Chris Hodgson had to navigate a maze of city laws before he could finally get his gourmet food truck, Dim and Den Sum, on the road last spring. It took more than two months — plus the guidance of a city councilman — for him to collect 14 pieces of official paper to get street legal for anywhere in the city. Among them: Three kinds of peddling permits; a health inspection certificate; a catering license; a vending license; and a fire inspection certificate. Estimated cost: $2,800.

“It’s a lot more difficult than what people think,” said Hodgson, a 24-year-old Cleveland-area native and culinary school graduate who has worked at Michelin Star restaurant The Spotted Pig in New York City as well as restaurants in Cleveland, California and Boston.

“That was probably the biggest frustration,” Hodgson said of his permit chase. “We’re chefs. We didn’t know how to figure out the process.” Help may be coming. The city is putting together legislation to simplify the permit process to one application and one fee, expected to be about $150. The goal is to see food trucks develop here as they have in other big cities.

At the same time, Cleveland wants to balance the concerns of restaurateurs, some of whom see food trucks — with their inexpensive gourmet fare and low overhead — as unfair competition. “We want to make it business-friendly and efficient,” said Kevin Schmotzer, of the city’s economic development department, which is working with other departments on the legislation.

The city also is trying to balance concerns of restaurateurs, some of whom see the food trucks — with their inexpensive gourmet fare and low overhead — as unfair competition.

In Cleveland, the city’s solution will be to limit the gourmet food trucks to “food deserts,” places where healthy food is unavailable, and where, presumably, there are few or no restaurants. Two examples: near the Rock ‘n’ Roll Hall of Fame & Museum or on certain quadrants of Public Square.

Photo from shawnmariani.com

Dim and Den Sum set up at the farmers markets on Public Square a few times this summer, often selling out most food onboard.

The legislation also may set minimum distances between a parked food truck and a restaurant, Schmotzer said. “We’re trying to make it a great program, an efficient program, one that supports the entrepreneurs of the food carts, because we want them,” Schmotzer said. “At the same time I don’t want our phones ringing with restaurant owners when these things are parked right out in front.”

That tension between mobile food vendors and bricks-and-mortar restaurants played out in Medina recently, when a Valley City woman asked the council to refine its laws so she could sell sandwiches from a cart parked on the city’s historic town square. The council dropped the issue after hearing from merchants on the square who were concerned about potential competition, said Planning Director Greg Hannan.

In June, the Cincinnati City Council designated three downtown locations where food trucks could park, and the city charges fees based on parking there every day for a year. Thomas Acito, owner of food truck Cafe de Wheels, said the locations are OK for attracting lunch customers but are useless for finding evening diners. “We have this whole business district, and we don’t have anywhere we can do business at night or for dinner,” Acito said.

Dim and Den Sum started out by doing late-night stops outside nightclubs such as the Flying Monkey Pub in Tremont or the Happy Dog in the Detroit-Shoreway neighborhood. Mike Snyder, owner of the Flying Monkey, said Dim and Den Sum is a good addition to his block, on Jefferson Avenue at the corner of Professor. Nearby is a Thai restaurant, Ty Fun, and fine dining such as Fahrenheit, across the street. Dim and Den appeals to his customers, who want food that is quick, but sophisticated, Snyder said.

The Flying Monkey doesn’t sell food, so Snyder lets his customers bring Dim and Den Sum into his establishment. “The guys who run the truck are great,” Snyder said. “Their food is great. They clean up after themselves. They have their own garbage cans. We haven’t had a problem with them at all.”
Hodgson said, however, that lately he has been focusing on serving the lunch crowd, because business there is better. “We have to find big groups of people,” Hodgson said.

Plus, doing lunch and late-night both was turning Dim and Den Sum into an exhausting, round-the-clock operation. “We’re a small group of chefs, and we get tired,” Hodgson said. Dim and Den Sum fans keep track of the truck’s movements and menu by “liking” the business on Facebook, checking its mobile app, going to dimanddensum.com or following @DimAndDenSum on Twitter.

Myra Orenstein of Cleveland Independents, the organization for locally owned restaurants, said not all restaurateurs fear competition from gourmet food trucks. “When you look at Cleveland independents, they don’t look at each other as competition,” said Orenstein, who is president of her own marketing and advertising company, CATV Inc. “Anything that can be done to enhance the food scene is welcome.” Restaurants and food trucks attract different diners, Orenstein said. While food trucks are for on-the-go dining, a restaurant sells its ambiance and service.

Cleveland hopes to encourage gourmet food trucks, a trend that has caught on in cities such as New York, Washington, D.C., Atlanta, Chicago, San Francisco and Austin, Texas. One measure of the trend’s strength: Food Network this year launched a reality series, “The Great Food Truck Race,” in which gourmet food trucks competed for a $50,000 prize.

Food Network also hosted a contest last summer in which fans across the country could vote for their favorite food truck. Dim and Den Sum took third place among 280 contestants. Cleveland’s growing foodie culture and local-food movement make the conditions right for the high-end food trucks, Schmotzer said.

City Hall wants to encourage these entrepreneurs, many of whom don’t have the resources — access to upwards of $250,000 — to open a bricks-and-mortar restaurant. “You have a lot of people who have some amazing talents but they just don’t have the capital, especially in this lending environment,” Schmotzer said. “To get the experience of running something, this is a good stepping-stone.”

Gourmet food trucks, with their penchant for sophisticated cuisine using locally grown and raised food, are a great outlet for the urban gardens and farms that are blossoming across Cleveland, said Councilman Joe Cimperman, who helped Hodgson navigate the city permit process.

“The idea is to leverage and maximize the kind of economic development that occurs because of local food,” Cimperman said. “It’s a complete and totally sustainable economic development eco-system.”
Food trucks are not just for entrepreneurs, either, Orenstein said. A number of restaurant owners she knows are looking into getting their own food trucks on the road.

Lucas Dunn’s food cart business, Pedaling Hummus — a cart pulled by a bicycle — debuted on Public Square a few weeks ago. Dunn got started through a city pilot program aimed at spurring micro-economic development, promoting locally sourced and healthy food and supporting local artists through street vending businesses.

Dunn said, however, that business was slow, and he hopes to do better in the spring when more people will be out and about. Dunn’s also hoping to sell on the Case Western Reserve University Campus, where he thinks the students might be more familiar with his menu, which features chickpea spread and pita chips. Running a food truck business in Cleveland, however, does have its drawbacks: six months of chilly-to-cold weather.

Dunn said he may switch to hot chocolate and granola bars during the winter; Hodgson said he will shutter his meals-on-wheels operation during the cold months.

But Hodgson’s seven months on the road was so successful, he’s using the profits to open a bricks-and-mortar restaurant in Ohio City in May. He’s planning two more trucks. And in the meantime, he’ll do catering and special events. “My goal was to come here, establish a smaller business, show that we could get people behind it and open a restaurant,” Hodgson said. “I did it in seven months. And I’m still in shock.”

You can follow The Dim and Dem Sum Truck at Twitter.

Thanks to Time Out Chicago, food truck fans and followers in the Chicagoland area, now know where the candidates stand on the issue of allowing food trucks to operate within the city. Under a proposal by Aldermen Daley and Waguespack food trucks would be authorized by permit and regulated by the city to work on the streets of Chicago to sell their cuisine, and at the same time, be able to prepare the food on-site, unlike the current legislation which prevents anything but prepared food to be sold from trucks on private property.

Of the candidates running for Mayor of Chicago, an election that will be held on the February 22, 2011, 92% support legalizing cook-on-site food trucks. This is a good sign for voters and those of us who frequent the city, but do not live within their limits and thus cannot vote in this election that food trucks may be closer than ever once the new mayor is elected. Here are what the candidates said.

Carol Moseley Braun: “Support, and I applaud Ald. Waguespack’s leadership on this issue.”

Cynthia Plaster Caster: “Well, if they allow it in cities like Chicago, then they’ll have to legalize it in other great cities like New York and Los Angeles…oh, wait!…they already have! It’s ridiculous that cook-on-site food trucks are not allowed. Especially when you see them for movie-set catering.”

Gery Chico: “They need to be held to the same health and safety standards as bricks-and-mortar restaurants. As long as the source of the food is safe and the equipment used to store and sell the food is safe, I believe it will enrich our experience as citizens to be able to taste foods and have culinary experience from other cultures throughout the city.”

Annazette Collins: “I didn’t know that was an issue because I see those food trucks all the time but I didn’t know they couldn’t cook on them. So we’d have to hire more city inspectors to license them and inspect them. That would give more people jobs. I’d probably be okay with that.”

Christopher Cooper: “I support it. I am a native New Yorker—raised in New York City—one of the things that I miss about NYC are the sidewalk pushcarts on which food is prepared.”

Miguel del Valle: “Cook-on-site food trucks represent healthy competition and open up more entrepreneurship opportunities in a city in need of job creation. These food trucks could also be used to bring more food access—including nutritious options—to underserved neighborhoods.”

Rahm Emanuel: “I do not believe cook-on-site food trucks should be illegal. The ordinance proposed by Aldermen Daley and Waguespack takes a good first step by allowing for preparation of fresh foods on mobile food facilities and commissaries throughout the city, while maintaining stringent health regulations and protecting local business owners. I believe we should be doing more to promote access to fresh foods throughout the city and encourage innovation in our food industry.”

Rickey Hendon: “I’m not as familiar with cook-on-site food trucks, but I wouldn’t necessarily be against them as long as they are licensed.”

Rev. James T. Meeks: “Food trucks overall have the potential to create new employment opportunities and small-business growth, so it’s definitely a boost to the local economy. If they obey the health and safety rules, I’m in favor of it.”

R. Emmett Tyrrell Jr: “Naturally, I am in favor.”

William “Dock” Walls: “I am in favor of cook-on-site food trucks. Cultural events are made better when participants , attendees and others have an opportunity to taste the local fare. The trucks will enable vendors to achieve their dreams.”

Fredrick K. White: “I am against it. It would be wrong to have trucks sitting outside established restaurants competing for customers. It would also be very hard to enforce any type of health codes.”

As you can see, other than Fredrick K. White, it appears most of the candidates will provide their full backing of the food truck industry in Chicago just  as other major US cities currently do. Apparently Mr. White hasn’t left the city to visit other metropolises like Los Angeles, New York, or Washington DC to see how mobile cuisine is helping provide jobs, additional tax revenue and fantastic foods to population in these areas.

As we mentioned last month, influential foodie guide Zagat added food trucks to its list of

eateries it reviewed. Earlier this week, the creators of this guide made finding food trucks easier with the launch of Zagat Food Trucks, a free website designed to help hungry New Yorkers locate their favorite mobile cuisine.

The map, now in its beta testing phase, was created by creative interactive agency JESS3, allows users to search for food trucks by location, by cuisine and by Zagat food rating. Once a user has chosen a food truck, the site will indicate its location, social media links (Facebook, Foursquare and Twitter), as well as its Zagat ratings and reviews. Currently, Zagat’s top-rated food trucks are limited to trucks in the Manhattan area.

Trucks will also be able to make their wandering whereabouts known by tweeting their locations to @ZagatTrucks, which automatically updates the app. While there’s no mobile app version of this service, users can follow the action on their mobile browsers.

About Zagat Survey, LLC

Known as the “wildly popular” “burgundy bible,” Zagat Survey is the world’s most trusted source for consumer-generated survey information. With a worldwide network of surveyors, Zagat rates and reviews restaurants, hotels, nightlife, movies, music, golf, shopping and a range of other entertainment categories and is lauded as the “most up-to-date,” “comprehensive” and “reliable” guide, published on all platforms. Zagat content is available to consumers wherever and whenever they need it: on ZAGAT.com, ZAGAT.mobi, ZAGAT TO GO for smartphones and in book form.

Movember

It’s Movember, time to grow a mo or a support a bro as “a gentleman is, after all, still a man no matter how gentle he is.”  The Movember movement started 7 years ago by 30 mates in Australia and the phenomena has grown worldwide; now 9 other countries are on board including New Zealand, USA & Canada.

Participate or Donate

Last year over 128 000 Mo Bro & Mo Sistas participated in earning 21 million dollars for men’s health charities.  Participants begin clean shaven on November 1st then proceed to grow a Mo until the campaign closes on 10th December, using this as an opportunity to promote the cause and acquire nominee sponsorship.

The face of men’s health in terms of public awareness and charitable funding is pale in comparison to that of women’s health, though the moustache symbol is becoming iconic, easily recognizable as a cause worthy of donation.  This is especially the case in Australia, though fund raising endeavors are now occurring throughout November across the globe.

Sporting the Stash for Cash & the Cause

Movember 2010 Campaign’s slogan is “Every Man Deserves a Bit of Luxury” and their official Australian Foundation site explains, “As a result of a lack of awareness around men’s health issues in the past, many men today do not fully understand or know about the risks they face.”  The luxury of awareness, education and funding is being afforded to men with this effective campaign.

It is a fact that cancer occurs more frequently in men and research shows men require resources in identifying issues, seeking treatment and looking out for one another in terms of health.  The moustache symbol is a comedic spin and a humorous catalyst for behavioural change regarding serious matters.  Part of the intention of this campaign is to “give men the opportunity and confidence to talk about their health.”

The Movember Foundation Register

The premise behind Movember is simple in that participants begin with an online registration: If you’re back for 2010, you login and reactivate your account or if you’re new to Movember you sign up and begin.   From there participants campaign either individually or on a team, earning support through nominations and the possibility of receiving some prestige such as Man of Movember, Miss Movember or Team Mo, meaning the campaign is open for everyone to participate, including women in support of their men.

The moustache is now iconic with this international campaign aiming in large part to break down the barriers and taboos surrounding the men’s health movement. Movember United States is a distinguished foundation and the iconic moustache is held in high esteem.  The international organization originated in Australia which speaks to the campaign’s cleverly designed nature whereby public awareness and funding is raised for serious men’s health issues addressed with a vital sense of humor; therein lies the secret of this greatly successful, ever growing campaign.

Do your part today, sign up for Team Mobile Cuisine and donate to this great cause. If you are already a member and belong to another team, feel free to just donate.

Team Mobile Cuisine’s Movember Page